More choices might not be better

From this blog

“When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire too Much of a Good Thing?” Iyengar, S. S., & Lepper, M. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79, 995-1006. (2000).

This paper explored the phenomena of “choice overload.” Here is what they did.

They created two displays of gourmet jams. One display had 24 jars. The other had 6. Each display invited people to try the jams and offered them a discount coupon to buy the jam. They alternated these displays in a grocery store and tracked how many people passed the displays, how many people stopped and sampled the jams, and how many subsequently used the offered coupon to buy the jam.

The results were surprising.

* 24 jar display: 60% of the people passing the display sampled the jam, 3% purchased jam.
* 6 jar display: 40% of the people passing the display sampled the jam, 30% purchased jam.

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3 thoughts on “More choices might not be better

  1. Hi Joe, (I procrastinate by reading your blog)

    A more comprehensive discussion on the topic in the book, The Paradox of Choice, by Barry Schwartz.

    Intriguing findings! We often think we know what we want, but empirical findings suggest quite the contrary.

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